Sermon Discussion Guide—Galatians 5:22-26

  1. Where else in scripture do we see agricultural language used concerning the people of God? 
  2. When was humanity first entrusted with fruit-bearing? How is this theme carried into Paul’s teaching to the Galatians?
  3. Is the focus in vv. 22-23 an end to themselves, or a result of something else far greater? 
  4. In v.24 Paul writes, “And those who belong to Christ Jesus have crucified the flesh with its passions and desires.” Is the idea of our flesh being “crucified” fully complete, ongoing, or both? What does this mean in our day-to-day lives
  5. Paul is confronting a life of “earning rather than abiding.” Briefly discuss the idea of abiding and obeying in relationship to living a “fruitful” life from John 15:1-17

Sermon Discussion Guide:Eph 4:11-17

Date : 01/15/2023

Series: Mission of the Church

Sermon Title : Equip

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OVERVIEW

Paul calls the church to unity by reminding them that Christ had given gifts to the church to equip it for the work of ministry. He explains that the focus of the church’s equipping is that it would be built up in unity, knowledge, maturity, stability, and love. Jesus names these gifts as teachers of the word. These gifts were first the apostles but are understood to include those who are called, confirmed, and commissioned to teach God’s word. These gifts equip the saints by through their willingness to teach God’s word wisely and whimsically. As they do so, the church members are best prepared to carry out the Great Commandment and Great Commission. When the gifts are utilized that Christ has given, the church grows for the glory of Christ. 

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CORROBORATING TEXT

2 Cor 3:4-8; 2 TIm 3:16-17; Eph 4:1-6; Heb 13:17; James 3:1

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QUESTIONS

  1. Who were the “gifts” Paul was speaking of, and who does it include today?
  2. Why were these “gifts” given?
  3. From this list in Ephesians 4, how should we labor to equip the church for the work of ministry?
  4. What should be the goal of “equipping” the saints in Christ?
    1. Unity (v.13)
    2. Knowledge (v.13)
    3. Maturity (v.13)
    4. Stability (v.14)
    5. Love (v.16)
  5. According to v.15, how should leadership equip the church?
    1. Speaking (Willingly)
    2. Speaking the truth (Wisely)
    3. Speaking the truth in love (Whimsically)
  6. Discuss the two questions every Christian should ask about the church they are a member of.
    1. Is the leadership of my church focused on equipping me in the word? 
    2. Do I want to be equipped or entertained? 
  7. How should every member seek to equip other believers for the work of ministry?
    1. Willingly, wisely, and whimsically.
  8. How can you help equip others in the church, or how can you commit to being equipped through the church?
    1. Some opportunities:
      1. Meditate on the text and sermon during the week. 
      2. Midweek Cor Seminars
      3. Discipleship Groups to discuss the sermon.
        1. Meet with an elder or group of people from your Life Group to discuss the sermon more deeply.

Sermon Discussion Guide: John 17

Date : 01/08/2023

Series: Mission of the Church

Sermon Title : Engage

OVERVIEW—Jesus, with his eyes set on the cross, prays to the father. As the perfect high priest, Jesus prays for himself, those closest to him, and the universal church. Jesus’ prayer followed the role of a priest on the day of atonement, and yet shows his heart for the mission God sent him to accomplish. As we engage the world, we must do so prayerfully. First, we pray ourselves, for those serving with us, and then for those who have yet to believe in Jesus.

CORROBORATING TEXT—Lev. 16; John 6:37, 38-39, 13:34-35, 14:1-3, 15;  Phil 2:9-11; 1 John 2:3

QUESTIONS

  1. What does Jesus mean by “the hour has come?” 
  2. What is the goal of engaging the world with the gospel (vv.2-4)?
  3. How does this change your focus?  
  4. Do you think of God’s glory when you consider sharing the gospel? 
  5. Why does Jesus pray for the disciples? 
  6. What are two areas Jesus is concerned about for his disciples? 
  7. As we pray for those on mission with us (other church members, mission partners, etc.), we should pray for what they believe and do. 
  8. In v.19, what does Jesus say will complete the work of the gospel? 
  9. How should what Jesus said in v.19 determine how we engage the world for the glory of God? 
  10. In verses 20-26, Jesus prays for those who have yet to believe. What is his primary concern?
  11. Have you ever thought about unity as a gospel issue?
  12. Jesus desires to bring his disciples to himself as a final unifying act. How does prayer help us care for others? Have you ever prayed for your enemies or the difficult people in your life?

Sermon Discussion Guide:Matthew 1:18-25 & Rev 1:4-5

Date : 12/18/2022

Series: Advent

Sermon Title : Love

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OVERVIEW

Matthew records the account of the angel telling Joseph that Mary “will bear a son, and you shall call his name Jesus, for he will save his people from their sins” (Matt 1:21). This should leave us asking how Jesus could accomplish such a great task. John’s revelation helps us understand how by giving three “names/roles” for Jesus. John writes that the letter is from “Jesus Christ the faithful witness, the firstborn of the dead, and the ruler of kings on earth” (Rev 1:4-5). By introducing Jesus this way, we see the three Old Testament offices of prophet, priest, and king being fulfilled by Jesus. This matters! This is an important way we can confidently trust that Jesus did provide a way for our sins to be forgiven. 

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CORROBORATING TEXT

Ex 13:17-22, 40:34-38; 2 Sam 8:15; Ps 8:6; Mark 1:15; John 3:16; Heb 9:24, 10:11-14; Rev 19:16

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QUESTIONS

  1. What is the importance of Isaiah’s prophecy being restated in Matthew 1?
  2. What is the significance of Mary having a “son” with a “name?”
  3. Why was it necessary for Jesus’ name to be “Immanuel?”
  4. How does the personhood of Jesus contribute to his ability to “save his people from their sins?”
  5. According to Rev 1:4-5, what are the three Old Testament offices Jesus fulfills? 
  6. What does it mean for Jesus to be a “prophet?”
  7. What does it mean for Jesus to be a “priest?”
  8. What does it mean for Jesus to be “king?”
  9. How does Jesus fulfilling these three roles give you comfort in your salvation? 

Advent- Joy


Psalm 51 Advent week 3 Joy

1) What does vs 1-3 tell us about David’s view of God and how does that view compare with yours today?

2) On what grounds does David submit his plea?

3) What reason/excuse does David offer for his sin?

4) How does David’s plea show us that improving one’s moral behavior is not adequate for salvation?

5) If forgiveness is from God and restoration is from God, in His mercy, what does that imply as to the assurance of our salvation? What other scripture texts support your answer?

6) What is our joy and responsibility with the pardon we receive? vs 13-14

7) What do vs 16-17 mean by stating God does not delight in sacrifice?

8) In what ways should this text give the Christian believer “Joy”?

Sermon Discussion Guide – Ephesians 1:1-14

ADVENT—HOPE

  1. What is the source of Christian hope?
  2. God deserves our praise for many reasons, but what does Paul point out in verse 3?
  3. According to v.4, when did the hope of our salvation begin? 
  4. If the hope of our salvation originated before “the foundation of the world,” what does this mean for us today? 
  5. What does it mean to be redeemed? 
  6. According to verses 6, 12, &14, how should we respond to the hope we have? 
  7. What does Paul mean in verse 10 when he says that God plans to “unite all things in Him [Jesus], things in heaven and things on earth?”
    1. Discuss Christ as the completion of all things in your life with what Paul says in Rom. 8:29.
  8. What does Paul say is the “seal’ of our belief in the gospel? 
  9. If worship should be our response to our hope in Christ, who should be the object of our worship? 

Sermon Discussion Guide:Galatians 5:13-15

Date : 11/013/2022

Series: Freedom in Christ

Sermon Title : Freed to Love

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OVERVIEW

Paul begins this section by contrasting the Judiazers who should be “cut off” to the true Christians in Galatia. The true followers of Christ were freed but not to live carelessly for their gain. No, just as the Judiazers were spreading a message of legalism, Paul warns against the opposite danger, license. The freedom Christ purchased for the children of God is evidenced in their lives by serving others. Paul even references Jesus teaching that the law is fulfilled in loving your neighbor as yourself. However, the church in Galatia was being torn by false teachers. Their teaching led to self-love, resulting in the Galatian Church “biting and devouring one another.” This type of behavior is not suitable for the church internally and is not good for their witness externally. 

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CORROBORATING TEXT

Lev 19:18; Matt 27: 33-40; Gal 5:9-12; Phil 2:3-5 

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QUESTIONS

  1. How would you define freedom?
  2. Does our eternal security in Jesus free us to live however we want? 
  3. How does Paul define freedom? 
  4. What does loving service look like in the church? 
  5. How are we able to know what true love is?
  6. What does Paul say self-focused legalism or self-love rooted in license will result in (v.15)? 
  7. What are some practical ways you can love others in the church?  

Sermon Discussion Guide:Galatians 5:7-12

Date : 11/06/2022

Series: Freedom in Christ

Sermon Title : The Dangers of False Teaching

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OVERVIEW

Paul encourages the Galatians in their walk of faith, but he is still concerned that they are being led astray. In this section, he speaks directly of the false teachers and his desire for their divine punishment. The Judaizers, though they were few, were very persuasive. Paul likens them to leaven, which affects an entire loaf of bread. Here Paul draws from the OT teaching that they should only eat unleavened bread during the seven days of Passover. Because of their false teaching and influence in Galatia, Paul did not want them to stop at circumcision but desired that they would be castrated. Paul wanted them removed from the fellowship of God’s people. The Judaizers were dangerous and divisive, and the Galatians were to consider them accursed. 

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CORROBORATING TEXT

Ex 12:15; Deut 23:1 Luke 17:2; 1 Cor 1:18, 23-24; 16:22;; Phil 1:6.

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QUESTIONS

  1. How could Paul be encouraged by the Galatians when he has been so hard on them? 
  2. Where did Paul’s hope for the Galatian church lie?
  3. Why does the combination of grace and works make for such a deadly mix?
  4. What four dangers were mentioned in regard to false teaching? 
  5. Why was Paul personally frustrated with the false teachers? 
  6. What does Paul mean when he says “offense of the cross?”
  7. Why is the cross offensive to unbelievers? 
  8. What final judgment does Paul place upon the false teachers? What is he referring to in the OT? 

Sermon Discussion Guide:Galatians 5:1-6

Date : 10/30/2022

Series: Freedom in Christ

Sermon Title : Standing Firm in the Advantages of Christ

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OVERVIEW

Paul moves in his argument to help the Galatians see what they have been freed in Christ too. He explains that human effort, specifically circumcision and uncircumcision, mean nothing. Righteousness is dependent upon faith. Returning to the burden of the law is to be severed from the benefits of grace. On the other hand, there is hope through the Spirit for all who trust the promises of God. This hope begins in this life but is anchored in eternity.

 In Christ, all who trust the promises of God are freed to live in light of Christ’s fulfillment of the law, to live in the Spirit, to commune with God, and to hope that is eternal.  

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CORROBORATING TEXT

John 3:5, 8:36; Rom 8:3-5, 10:11-13; 2 Cor 5:1-5, Gal 3:13; 1 John 3:2-3

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QUESTIONS

  1. What has Christ set us free too? 
  2. Discuss Paul’s references to “standing firm” and “waiting eagerly” in light of our daily Christain lives. 
  3. What is the “great exchange?” (Gal 3:13)
  4. What does it mean to be freed to New Covenant Blessings? How has Jesus lifted the Old Covenant restrictions?
  5. What does it mean to be freed to live in the Spirit? Discuss the Spirit’s role in v.5. 
  6. What does it mean to be freed to commune with God? Why is this important?
  7. What does it mean to be free to hope through the Spirit, by faith?
  8. What are some things you put your hope in? 
  9. What are some things you look to make you feel more holy, righteous, or hopeful? How can these things keep you from living freely in Christ? 
  10. What does it mean to live with eternal hope? 

Sermon Discussion Guide: Galatians 4:21-31

Date : 10/23/2022

Series: Freedom in Christ | Galatians 4:21-31

Sermon Title : Children of Freedom

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OVERVIEW

Paul calls the church’s attention to the Old Testament story of Abraham and Sarah. He does so to support his argument that human effort outside of trusting in God will never result in His pleasure. The Judaizers were leading the Galatian church to try and appease God in their own strength, but they neglected to share that trying to keep part of the law always leaves one guilty of the whole. Isaac was the child of promise and freedom, and Ishmael was the child of slavery and excommunication. Those who are in Christ, like Isaac, are children of freedom! When this freedom is lived out in the church, division is dealt with, disunity is lessened, and freedom to grow in Christ is encouraged. 

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CORROBORATING TEXT

Gen. 16; Is. 53-55; Jn 8:6; Heb 12; 1 Peter 2:6; Revelation 14:1

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QUESTIONS

  1. In what sense does the gospel bring freedom from slavery? 
  2. What might it look like to rely on the law for salvation?
  3. How did Abraham and Sarah doubt the promise of God?
  4. How do we do this today?
  5. How is Isaac’s birth similar to our spiritual birth? What role does God play in each?
  6. If God still expects us to obey his word, how is a relationship with him different from being a slave to religion?
  7. When there is division and disunity in the church, how does it keep its members from enjoying the promises of God?
  8. How should embracing our freedom in Christ affect how we interact with fellow church members and lost people in our lives? 

Sermon Discussion Guide — Galatians 4:8-20

Overview |

Paul’s tone changes as he continues to encourage the Galatians to press on in the faith. His concern was that they had “turned back” to their old way of living. Paul didn’t understand how they could do such a thing—they were known by God. To encourage them, Paul invites them to become like him. He no longer lived under the heavy hand of the law, and the Galatians didn’t need to either. Even though the false teachers talked nicely to them, they were only trying to build their kingdoms. However, Paul was building them up in Christ. He was more concerned with the truth than he was with their feelings. 

 The heart of discipleship is 1) It is sacrificial (v.11), 2) It is observable and reproducible (v.12). 3) It is truthful (v.16), and 4) It desires the best. 

The goal of discipleship is to be conformed to Christ, so dear Christian, don’t turn back! 

CORROBORATING TEXT

Ps 139:1; Jer 1:4-5; Mat 7:21-23; Acts 20:17-21, 26-27; Rom 1:25, 8:29-30; 1 Cor 10:29

QUESTIONS

  1. What does Paul mean in v. 9 when he says “you have come to know God, or rather to be known by God?”
  2. Why is this an important distinction to make today? 
  3. Why was Paul concerned that he had labored in vain? What does this mean for the Galatians? Could they lose their salvation? 
  4. Why does Paul point out his illness to the Galatians? 
  5. Why do we think we have to have it all together before we can lead others?
  6. How did Paul feel the Galatians responded to the truth he shared?
  7. What characteristics can we learn about false teachers from v.17?
  8. How do those characteristics differ from Paul in v.18-20?
  9. What four principles did we learn about the heart of discipleship from this text?
    1. Discipleship requires sacrifice (v.11).
    2. Discipleship is reproducible (v.12).
    3. Discipleship always gives the truth in love (v.16). 
    4. Discipleship desires the best (v.19). 

Sermon Discussion Guide: Galatians 3:23-4:7

Date : 10/09/2022

Series: Freedom in Christ

Sermon Title : Adoption

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OVERVIEW

Paul helps the Galatians see the connection between Israel’s history and its current condition. Just as Israel had been held captive at different times throughout the OT only to be freed by God’s perfect grace, the Galatians were held captive by returning to the law. Their behavior was foolish since God had freed his children from the tyrannical rule of the law. Where the law holds captive, the promise provides freedom. So, when Christ came, the law was no longer needed as a “nanny” because God gave his Spirit to his children. As children of the promise, Paul encouraged the Galatians to turn from law-keeping and embrace their relationship with God the Father. The relationship he secured at the perfect time through his Son, the perfect Savior.

Jesus freed us from the tyranny of the law and purchased our freedom and acceptance in the family of God. 

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CORROBORATING TEXT

Gen. 3:22-24; Rev. 22

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QUESTIONS

  1. What was the role of the law?
  2. How is the law described in vv.23 & 24?
  3. When does Paul say the tyranny of the law would end? 
  4. If we are no longer under the law, what/who is our guardian? 
  5. By showing that in Christ, everyone can become a child of the promise by faith, what barriers is Paul breaking down? 
  6. What does it mean to be an heir? 
  7. What does Paul mean by “elementary principles of the world?”
  8. Discuss the significance of the phrases below from Galatians 4:4.
    1. “Fullness of time.”
    2. “Born of woman.”
    3. “Born under the law.”
  9. What is the role of the Holy Spirit in the context of Galatians 4:6 & 7?
  10. As Christians today, why is it foolish for us to return to a life of “rule keeping?” What are some ways you embrace rule-keeping to the exclusion of others?

Sermon Discussion Guide:Galatians 3:15-22

Date : 10/02/2022

Series: Freedom in Christ

Sermon Title : Law & Gospel

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OVERVIEW

 With Paul emphasizing grace over law, we must consider what role the law has in God’s design. In this section, Paul takes what many believe to be a round-a-bout route to explain how the law complements grace. He explains that there was one promise given to Abraham, one law given to Moses, and one Savior provided in Christ. At each point of redemptive history, God has been working to complement, not contradict, what has come before. The Mosaic law did not contridict the Abrahamic promise, and the New Covenant is the fulfillment of them both. Paul labors to explain this to show that through the one promise, one law, and ultimately one Savior, God has redeemed one people. The church is made up of Jews and Gentiles, men and women, poor and rich. Just as God is one, so are his people. 

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CORROBORATING TEXT

Gen. 17:7; Duet 3r3:2; 2 Cor. 1:20; Rom.7:10

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QUESTIONS

  1. Why does Paul labor to show the unchanging work of God through the Abrahamic and Mosaic covenants? 
  2. What does this teach us about God? 
  3. Why should we be comforted by the fact that God can not change? 
  4. On whom was the promise given to Abraham dependent? 
  5. When does the promise given to Abraham expire? 
  6. How does the law complement the gospel? What is the purpose of the law?
  7. When does the law expire? 
  8. According to verse 22, what are the roles of the law and the promise?
  9. How does the oneness of the promise, the law, and the gospel help us understand the oneness of the church?

Sermon Discussion Guide:Galatians 3:10-14

Date : 09/25/2022

Series: Freedom in Christ

Sermon Title : Redeemed From the Curse of the Law

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OVERVIEW

The law will always leave one guilty. It simply can’t provide innocence. Paul condemns the Galatians by pointing out that “all” who rely on works to make them righteous are under a curse. The curse of the law is death. All people, Jew or Gentile, are condemned unless they keep all of the law (perfectly, personally, and perpetually). With the verdict of guilt and death given, Paul proclaims that Christ came to redeem Christians from the law’s curse. Jesus did this by becoming the “accursed one” on our behalf. He kept the law and also paid the price of not keeping the law. Jesus’ finished work was accomplished to justify sinners, to include the nations (the blessing of Abraham), and to ensure the gift of the Holy Spirit. 

Christ took on the curse of sin so that we, by faith, are not condemned but are children of God–filled by his Spirit.  

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CORROBORATING TEXT

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Lev. 18:5; Deut. 27:26; Ezek. 18:24; Hab. 2:4; Acts 2:23; Rom. 1:18-23, 2:13; James 2:10-11

QUESTIONS

  1. What does justification mean? 
  2. How is one justified in the eyes of God?
  3. What is the promised result of a life lived under the law?
  4. Why is that the promised result? 
  5. Who is cursed by the law?
  6. If one were to try and live by the law, how would one have to keep it? (perfectly, personally, and perpetually). 
  7. Are you currently subconsciously living under the weight of the law? 
  8. With death established as the result of the law, how should the righteous live, according to v.11? 
  9. According to vv.13&14, how did Christ redeem us from the law’s curse? 
  10. What does it mean that Christ became “a curse for us?”
  11. What are three blessings Paul has shared that faith in Christ brings (hint, two are in v. 14)?
    1. Justification – Declared righteous before God, but not by works of the law.
    2. Inclusion – Jew and Gentile are included. 
    3. The gift of the Holy Spirit – The spirit of God is given to all who trust in Christ by faith. 

Sermon Discussion Guide:Galatians 3:1-9 Revisited

Date : 09/18/2022

Series: Freedom in Christ

Sermon Title : Guarding Against Foolishness

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OVERVIEW

Last week we looked at Paul’s reminder of the Christian life of faith. Paul has five rhetorical questions to help the Galatians think biblically when he reminds them of Abraham’s life of faith. Today we will look at the questions Paul asked to learn how we can avoid becoming foolish in the church. The Galatians had been “bewitched,” and Paul later writes that the Colossians had been “taken captive” by false teaching. 

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CORROBORATING TEXT

Matt 8:5-13, 26:4, Rom. 8:9-11; Colossians 2

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QUESTIONS

  1. Can a person be a Christian and be deceived by false teaching? 
  2. What are some examples of false teaching in the Church today?
  3. How does God’s sovereignty over salvation push back against human effort? 
  4. When we adopt a spiritual life of works, we are living as if Christ died in vain, and as if all we have faced is in vain. Why?
  5. According to Matthew 8:5-13, how does God show his miraculous power? How should this inform how we live today?
  6. Look at Colossians 2:6-15 and discuss how we should guard against falling into the same trap as the Galatians & Colossians?

Sermon Discussion Guide: Galatians 3:1-9

Date : 09/11/2022

Series: Freedom in Christ

Sermon Title : Faith Alone (Part 2)

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OVERVIEW

Paul confronts the Galatians directly. Their foolishness led them to be “bewitched” to the point of living as if they were not followers of Christ. He asked them several rhetorical questions to point out that their relationship to God was solely by faith, not by works. To further prove his point, Paul goes to the Old Testament. Abraham believed in God’s promises, and it was counted to him as righteousness. Abraham’s righteousness was not dependent on law-keeping. In fact, Abraham had done nothing to earn God’s favor, but God chose Abraham to be a blessing to many nations. God’s promise to Abraham by faith included the Gentiles and includes you and me today, as long as we come to God in Christ, by grace through faith. 

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CORROBORATING TEXT

Gen 12-17, & 22; Rom 4:1-12

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QUESTIONS

  1. Why did Paul think the Galatians were being foolish? 
  2. In what two ways did he confront them? 
  3. How can this happen to us today? Are there things that can “bewitch” you? 
  4. How do you combat being deceived in theological/doctrinal matters?  
  5. What was the point of the rhetorical questions Paul asked the Galatians? 
  6. Which question sums them all up? 
  7. How does Paul appeal to the past as a way to communicate justification by faith alone? 
  8. Discuss how Abraham’s conversion and obedience were rooted in the grace of God.
  9. What should the grace of God through Christ alone be in the life of every believer?
    1. How did Abraham display radical obedience?
    2. How can you, as a result of God’s grace, radically obey his word today? 

Sermon Discussion Guide:Galatians 2:11-21

Date : 08/28/2022

Series: Freedom in Christ

Sermon Title : Faith Alone (Part 1)

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OVERVIEW

Paul confronts Peter for his hypocrisy. He was enjoying his liberty in Christ by eating with Jews and Gentiles until a group of Jewish Christians came from Jerusalem. Concerned about what they might think of him, Peter took the law back upon himself and stopped eating with the Gentiles. Peter’s behavior was not in line with the gospel that he and Paul had shared in common earlier. Paul was concerned for Peter and for those he was influencing. He was also concerned for the Gentiles who would feel like “second-class Christians” because of Peter’s behavior. Paul points out that we are not declared righteous (justified) by our works of the law. So, if a Jew or Gentile lived under the weight of the law, they were living as if Christ had died in vain. To show the ridiculousness of this way of living, Paul points out that he had died with Christ in order to live in Christ by faith. The law can only condemn, but trusting in Christ by faith, one can be declared cleansed (justified).

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CORROBORATING TEXT

Mark 7:19; Acts 9,10,11; Rom. 3:20, 7,&8; Gal.6:1

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QUESTIONS

  1. Why was Paul confronting Peter?
  2. What can we learn from how Paul confronts Peter?
  3. How would you respond to someone if they pointed out sin in your life?
  4. When was the last time you lovingly pointed out sin in someone else’s life? How was it received?
  5. What is the role of the law?
  6. What does law produce?
  7. What does faith in Christ produce?
  8. In Gal. 2:19-20, Paul points out we have died to sin and self, but have been made alive in what?
  9. How is the “life we now” live supposed to be lived according to v.20?
  10. If the law can only point out our guilt but doesn’t make us guilty, why do we think the law can make us innocent?

Sermon Discussion Guide:Galatians 1:15-2:10

Date : 08/28/2022

Series: Freedom in Christ

Sermon Title : Running Intentionally

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OVERVIEW

Paul recalls his conversion and gives further proof that his calling did not come from man. He provides a detailed account of his post-conversion years to show how he was not dependent on the apostles’ approval. However, his argument was not meant to show a complete disconnect from the Jerusalem church. Still, Paul intended to show that his message was credible and consistent with the other apostles. Paul is ultimately accepted and sent out to the Gentiles with the very gospel the other apostles were taking to the Jews.

The gospel is not dependent on man, but God uses the consistency of the church to show that one’s testimony is credible.

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CORROBORATING TEXT

Acts 9 & 11

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

  1. Why was Paul so concerned with sharing his conversion story?
  2. Why was it necessary for Paul to establish his independence from “men,” specifically the Jerusalem church?
  3. Why was it necessary for Paul to finally go to Jerusalem?
  4. What about Paul’s conversion made his time with Peter so important?
  5. List a few ways Paul’s ministry was credible in the eyes of the apostles.
  6. Was Paul really disconnected from the church and the apostles?
  7. How has God historically guarded his church against error today?
  8. What are some ways God protects his church against error today?
  9. Is it good for a church to do things how they would like? Should churches seek to be “unique?”
  10. What did the apostles do in Galatians 2:10 when they were confident that Paul was preaching the same gospel as Peter?

Galatians 1:6-17

Sermon Discussion Guide:

Galatians 1:6-17

Date : 08/21/2022

Series: Freedom in Christ

Sermon Title : One True Gospel

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OVERVIEW

Paul is concerned with how quickly the Galatians turned from the one true gospel. This shows that the gospel must be maintained to avoid any drift into error. Paul does not hesitate to defend the gospel. He declares that anyone who preaches a “different gospel” is accursed. To establish his message’s divine origin and calling, Paul shares his testimony with the Galatians. He explains that his calling originated from God, as his message did. Paul was predestined to share the gospel with the Galatians. Like Paul, God created every Christian with a purpose. Simply put, we are to worship God with our entire life. 

God has created every Christian to know, defend and share the one true gospel. 

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CORROBORATING TEXT

Gen 2, 3:14-15; Joshua 6:17; Rom. 8:28-30; Matthew 28:18-20

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DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

  1. Why was Paul so concerned in v.6?
  2. Why is the threat of a “different gospel” so concerning?
  3. What did Paul say should happen to those who preach a false gospel?
  4. Who preached the first false gospel?
  5. How should we respond to teaching that adds to the gospel?
  6. Why does Paul share his testimony in vv.12-16?
  7. What does Paul make clear about his conversion in v.15-16a?
    1. Talk through each aspect.
  8. Where else in the Epistles does Paul give God the glory for his salvation?
  9. Why does Paul point out God’s sovereign grace in his conversion and calling?
  10. God’s sovereign grace has saved us and given us a purpose too. What is that purpose (explain from scripture)?

Sermon Questions: Galatians 1:1-5

Sermon Discussion Guide:

Galatians 1:1-5

Date : 08/014/2022

Scripture: Galatians 1:1-5

Series: Freedom in Christ

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OVERVIEW

Paul wrote to the Galatian church to address their having abandoned salvation by grace through faith. False teachers were teaching that one must be circumcised to be a church member, so Paul writes to call the Galatians back to the true gospel. In these introductory verses, Paul establishes his God-given authority and reminds the Galatians of the blessing of the gospel of Jesus Christ that delivers his people from this present age. 

God has established authority in every area of human life for the good of his people.

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CORROBORATING TEXT

Isaiah 60:10-12; Matthew 5: 17-20; Luke 6:12; Acts 15:12, 18:11, 20:28; Galatians 3:1, 5:1, 6:15; Ephesians 2:20, 6:4; Philippians 3:1-11, 1 Tim. 1:8; 1 Peter 5:2

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DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

  1. Why did Paul write to the Galatians?
  2. What is the tone of his letter?
  3. What is the issue he was addressing?
  4. Where did Paul’s authority come from?
  5. Why was this important?
  6. Why does he extend grace and peace to the Galatians in such detail in vv.3-5?
  7. What does Paul say God has delivered his people from in Christ?
  8. How has he extended that type of deliverance to us today?
  9. Discuss how the areas of God’s authority listed below are good when lived out biblically.
    1. Family
    2. Church
    3. State

Sermon Discussion Guide – Psalm 40

Sermon Discussion Guide:

 Psalm 40

Date : 08/07/2022

Scripture: Psalm 40

Series: Summer in the Psalms

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OVERVIEW

David praises God because he is trustworthy. Whatever “pit of destruction” David was facing, God was with him, he delivered him, and gave him a “new song.” God used David’s praises as a tool of evangelism and encouragement. David became more aware of his neediness when he faced further challenges, and again trusted God for salvation.

In every situation we can praise God because he is great.

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CORROBORATING TEXT

Exodus 21; Psalm 40: 9-10, 139:7-13; John 6:37-40; Hebrews 10:5-7

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DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

  1. Has there been a time in your life when God answered your prayers?
  2. How has God given you a “new song.”
  3. How does David’s praise result in evangelism and encouragement?
  4. How can we allow our praise to be a light to the world and an encouragement to the church?
  5. How did David describe his praise in verses 9-11?
  6. How would you describe your praise to God? What may be hindering the way you praise Him?
  7. In verses 11-17, David faces another trial. How does he respond?
  8. Look at verse 17a and discuss how David’s view of himself led to a healthy view of God.
  9. Do you see yourself as “needy” and God as the supplier of all your needs?

Sermon Discussion Guide Psalm 39:

 Psalm 39

Date : 07/31/22

Scripture: Psalm 39

Series: Summer in the Psalms

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OVERVIEW

David is suffering for his sin (unkown exactly what), and is responding to the Lord with this Psalm. He moves from silence to prayer, asking the Lord for perspective on the shortness of his life, for deliverance from his discipline, and for a return to joy. Out of this discipline, God is cultivating in David a posture of obedience, eternal perspective, dependence, and longing for the joy that only Christ can provide.

God is at work in our temporal suffering for our eternal good.

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CORROBORATING TEXT

Hebrews 12:11 – “For the moment all discipline seems painful rather than pleasant, but later it yields the peaceful fruit of righteousness to those who have been trained by it” 

James 3:5 – “How great a forest is set ablaze by such a small fire”

Psalm 90:12 – “Teach us to number our days, that we may gain a heart of wisdom”

Psalm 144:3-4 – “O LORD, what is man that you regard him, or the son of man that you think of him? Man is like a breath; his days are like a passing shadow.”

Job 14:1-2 – “Man who is born of a woman is few of days and full of trouble. He comes out like a flower and withers; he flees like a shadow and continues not.

James 4:14 – “You do not know what tomorrow will bring. What is your life? For you are a mist that appears for a little time and then vanishes.”

2 Corinthians 4:17 – “For this light momentary affliction is preparing for us an eternal weight of glory beyond all comparison”

Romans 8:18 – “For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worth comparing with the glory that is to be revealed to us.”

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DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

  1. Has there ever been a time in your life when a trial deepened your dependence on the Lord? How do you tend to respond to trials/suffering in your life?
  2. What were the three ways God uses suffering for our eternal good? Which was the most challenging or encouraging for you?
  3. How does the shortness of our life influence the way we act/think/speak?
  4. What does suffering teach us about the vanity of hoping in this life?
  5. Discuss how the shortness of life is an encouragement for the suffering believer, but a terror for the suffering unbeliever.
  6. Why should we run to God in our suffering, rather than from Him?
  7. What does the cross teach us about how God uses suffering for our eternal good?
  8. How does suffering help us long for eternity? What do we have to look forward to?

Sermon Discussion Guide- Psalm 38

Sunday, July 24, 2022
Scripture: Psalm 38
Series: Summer in the Psalms

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OVERVIEW

Because of his sin, David suffers from conviction, physical sickness, mental anguish, and relational abandonment. While experiencing these horrible things, he cries out to God for salvation. Psalm 38 is a Psalm of memorial, which means it is a Psalm of remembrance. David knew that it was more important to experience the forgiveness of God rather than the comforts of this world. So today, we can walk the path of forgiveness confidently in Christ’s strength – he became vulnerable so that you can be victorious!

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CORROBORATING TEXT

Ps. 7:12-13, 37:7, 38:9, 38:18, 69:5; Pr.3:11-12; Jn 5:1-17; 1 Peter 2:22-25

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DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

  1. What is the significance of David writing a Psalm of remembrance? 
  2. What issues did David face as a result of his sin? 
  3. Is this the way God always deals with sin? 
  4. Was David angry at God for his judgmental hand? 
  5. What does David’s response show about his heart for God? What was his primary focus in this Psalm? 
  6. Why can we trust God and become vulnerable in his presence? 
  7. How did David display this in Psalm 38?
    • He prioritized God’s word over negative worldly voices (vv.13-14).
    • He confesses sin when he becomes aware of it. (v.18).

Psalm 37 – The Greatest Sermon in a Psalm

Our Rest, our righteousness, our response and our redeemer

1.Proverbs compares the foolish to the wise. What are the comparison groups in Psalm 37? What are the comparison groups inthe Sermon on the Mount?

2. What are the two different mindset perspectives form our responses to our daily challenges? How does each perspective effect our thoughts on verse 1? Is life fair?

3. In verses 2- 8 What actions can we take in each verse to find rest? What are our “rewards”? In what different perspectives can we see Oprah’s favorite verse(4)?

4. In Romans 3: 1-23 Where is our righteousness before a holy God? What comparisons did Jesus give in the Sermon on the Mount?

5. From Paul’s example of Abraham in Romans 4, how much of our righteousness comes from what we do? How much from our rituals? How does Genesis 15:6 explain why Abraham was declared righteous?

6. Verses 9-30 gives examples of how the righteous live. What are examples of what our attitudes should be?

7. What kind of actions will display the fruits of our trusting in God?

8. What are the truths about God we acknowledge?

9. Even if we have the right attitude, perform the appropriate actions and acknowledge God for who he is….Where does our salvation come from?

10. Read Matthew chapter 5:17-18 How did Jesus fulfill the law. How does Romans 10

Sermon Questions Psalm 36

1) The title of Psalm 36 identifies David as a Servant. How do we view that title in contrast to David?

2) Who do verses 1-4 describe? Identify the key terms.

3) Where else in scripture do we find warnings of such terms/behavior? (vs 2-Prov 29:5, vs 3- Provide 2:12, 4:24, 12:13, compare Prov 15:2,28; see also Gen 3)

4) Who do verses 5-9 describe? How does this contrast with vs 1-4?

5) Discuss the implications of vs 9 for those who belong to God and those who don’t? What does it mean to belong to God?

6) How can the plea in vs 10 be utilized in our daily lives?

Psalm 35

1. How should Christians think about imprecatory Psalms?

2. Do we pray against the evil workings of this earth?

3. Are we praying for the demise of our enemies’ sin; that they will repent and call upon the name of the Lord?

4. Are we praying for the demise of the sin in our own hearts?

5. Do we reflect in our assurance in Christ?

6. Do we praise God for His kept promises?

7. Are we praying for the persecuted church- for their faithfulness and God’s justice?

Psalm 34 Sermon Questions

Taste and See that the LORD is Good

  1. Identify the actions in vs 1-3 and what they represent?
  2. Discuss the benefits of gathered corporate worship Vs 3
  3. What do vs 4-7 say about man? about God?
  4. What is the significance and implication of vs 8? (Taste and See)
  5. Discuss the contrast between vs15 and vs16
  6. Identify the verses that speak of deliverance. How do these apply to the Christian today?
  7. Identify the verses that speak of God’s protection and refuge. How does this differ from  deliverance?
  8. In what ways do vs 20-22 display God’s sovereign power?
  9. How does this text point us to Jesus?

Psalm 33 Sermon Questions

A Praise Song for All for the Steadfast Love of God

We serve a God who is worthy to be praised. He deserves the uninhibited praises
of His people. He deserves our best songs, our loudest shouts, and our devoted
service. Too often, we allow other things to cloud our thinking and distract us
from focusing entirely on God. Psalm 33 encourages us to not only take a fresh
look at all He has done for those of us who claim Jesus as Lord of our lives but
also His providence and care for all.

  1. Has the Lord blessed you in a specific way this week?
  2. Have you given Him the praise and thanksgiving for this particular blessing?
  3. What does the description of His word being upright and His work being done in
    faithfulness mean to you?
  4. Discuss what it means for all the earth to fear the Lord and stand in awe of Him?
  5. How do feel about the fact that the Lord “looks down from heaven” on you?
  6. How do you think any unsaved family members or friends feel about this?
  7. In light of all the “ungodly” things going on in our country and around the world
    are comforted by God’s omniscience and His providence as described in Psalm 33?
  8. Can those who are not the Lord’s praise Him?
  9. Discuss Matthew 5:43-45 in comparison to Psalm 33.
  10. How do the first three verses of Psalm 33 compare to the last three?

Psalm 32 Sermon Questions

Rejoice in Repenting

  1. What other Psalm is Psalm 32 related to (vv.1-2)? 
  2. Upon what is our union with God dependent? 
  3. What does our union with God accomplish (vv.1-2)?
    1. Why is this so important?
  4. Can our communion with God be hindered? If so, what can hinder it?
  5. As a result of David’s lack of repentance, what were some of the consequences? 
  6. How does David reestablish communion with God (v.5)?
  7. How does God show us our sin (v.8)?
  8. How should we respond to God’s forgiveness and acceptance when we confess our sins (v.8)?
  9. What keeps you from confessing sin?
  10. What does it look like for you to “rejoice” in the Lord?

Nahum 3 Sermon Questions

Take Heart, God has Overcome the World

  1. According to verses one through seven, why did God judge the city of Nineveh?
  2. What was at the heart of Nineveh’s mistreatment of Thebes?
  3. In what way were Nineveh’s defenses ineffective?
  4. How would Nineveh’s enemies ultimately respond to her?
  5. Discuss the allure of trusting in your strength against trusting in the omnipotent power of God (Proverbs 18:10).

Nahum 2 Sermon Questions

  1. How is Nahum’s message like that of Jonah?
  2. How did Nahum describe Nineveh’s immediate future under the judgment of God?
  3. Take some time to read and consider Psalm 145:20 in light of what you have learned about God’s judgment so far.
  4. The most terrifying words in scripture may be when God declares, “I am against you” (Nahum 2:13). Take some time to think about how God, if you have trusted in Jesus, will never say these words about you.
  5. Discuss Jesus’ explanation of himself in Matt 11:29 concerning what you have learned so far about the character of God.

Nahum 1 Sermon Questions

God, the True Avenger

  1. Who was Nahum’s vision meant to comfort? Who was Nineveh in relation to Israel?
  2. In what ways do you see God’s omnipotence (unlimited power) displayed in chapter one?
  3. Compare God’s feelings toward evil with those who take refuge in him.
  4. Where in the New Testament is Nahum 1:15 referenced?
  5. How does God’s omnipotence bring you comfort in your everyday life?

Jonah 4 Sermon Questions

  1. Why was Jonah upset at the response of Nineveh?
  2. How upset was Jonah? Why do you think he wanted to die?
  3. Discuss how God’s heart for Nineveh is different from Jonah’s.
  4. Throughout the book of Jonah, the word of the Lord comes to Jonah three times. Why? Think about how God’s love for his people is paramount.
  5. Discuss the similarities of the heart of God from Exodus 34:6-7, Joel 2:13, and Jonah 4:2.

Jonah 3 Sermon Questions

  1. The word of the Lord came to Jonah a second time. What does this show about the heart of God for the people of Nineveh?
  2. How do the Ninevites respond to Jonah’s warning?
  3. How does God respond to the repentance of Nineveh?
  4. Discuss how Jonah experienced a revival in Nineveh but he was still not convinced of God’s plan.
  5. How do these verses help us understand God’s grace in light of repentance? Read 1 John 1:9 and discuss the heart of Jesus for those who turn to him.

Jonah 2 Sermon Questions

  1. How does Jonah respond when he realizes the favorable presence of God is to be preferred to his judgment?
  2. What does Jonah reveal about his understanding of God from how he praises him?
  3. Discuss how a high view of God helps us obey him during difficult times.
  4. How does God respond to Jonah’s praises? What can we learn about God from his response to disobedient Jonah?
  5. Jonah thought he could find freedom by running from the will of God but ultimately sees that true deliverance comes only from him. Discuss how you have sought “freedom” in your ability and share how God has provided you pathways of deliverance.

Jonah 1 Sermon Questions

There Is No Place to Hide From the Presence of God

  1. In chapter 1, from what was Jonah fleeing?
  2. What can we learn from Jonah 1 about how God views those who disobey him?
  3. In what ways did Jonah’s fleeing affect his life and the life of those around him?
  4. Discuss Jonah’s response to the Lord with the mariners’ response to the Lord.
  5. How does our response to the Lord display the posture of our hearts?

Mark 16 Sermon Questions

  1. In v.1, why were the women bringing spices to anoint the body of Jesus? What does this show they believed about Jesus’ death?
  2. In v.3, what were they most concerned with?  
  3. In v.4, the women saw that the stone was rolled away. What are some other stories in scripture you can remember God doing extraordinary things with ordinary means? 
  4. Why was it important for a group of women to witness the resurrection of Jesus? 
  5. How are you tempted to lose sight of what God is doing in the ordinariness of your life? 
  6. What is the significance of Mark singling Peter out in verse seven? 
  7. How does God seeking Peter out encourage you in your walk with him? How does it help you pray for others who have wandered far from him? 
  8. Read John 6:39-40 and discuss the eternal security (perseverance of the saints) of those who are truly saved.
  9. Discuss how through fear and astonishment, the good news of Jesus Christ could not be contained (Mk. 16:15; Mt. 28:18-20; Lk. 24:46-49). In a long line of obedient Christians, think about how you received the gospel.
  10. How has the resurrection reminded you that God is doing extraordinary things through ordinary means? 

Mark 15:42-47 Sermon Questions

The Burial of Jesus: The Cost of Following Christ

  1. What was Mark’s significance in sharing the time and type of day in v.42? 
  2. How should this comfort us when questioning the timing of events in our own lives?
  3. Who was Joseph of Arimathea? 
  4. How does what we know about Joseph inform our understanding of what it meant for him to come and ask Pilate for Jesus’ body? 
  5. How does the burial of Jesus help prove the death and resurrection of Jesus? 
  6. Jesus taught, “If anyone would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross and follow me” (Mk 8:24). How should the obedience of Christ on the cross and Joseph’s courage compel us to live courageously for him? 
  7. Is there a specific area you need to follow Christ courageously? Take some time to share and pray for these areas of obedience.

Mark 15:33-41 Blog Questions

  1. What does darkness generally indicate in the Bible? 
  2. What did Jesus mean when he cried out, “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?”
  3. Was God not present at this moment in Jesus’ life?
  4. Why did the crowd think Elijah might come to rescue Jesus?
  5. In John’s gospel, he records Jesus saying, “It is finished.” What significance did this statement have to the original audience? What hope should we have in Jesus’ declaration?  
  6. Why did the curtain in the temple tear when Jesus died?
    1. Give scriptural support to your answers.
  7. What were the three things Pastor Matt pointed out about the Centurion’s response to Jesus? 
  8. How can these things be our response to the death of Jesus today? 
  9. Think about the role of women in the ministry of Jesus. How important were they? Discuss how complementarianism provides a biblical framework for men and women to flourish in complementing roles in every arena. 
  10. Discuss how Jesus, in his life and death, provides hope for humanity.

Mark 15:21-33 Blog Questions

  1. Take some time to look back at the prophecies fulfilled during the first three hours of Jesus’ crucifixion.
  2. Why do you think the Holy Spirit led the gospel writers to leave out the details of the crucifixion?
  3. Think back to Satan’s temptation of Eve, and discuss what foundational issue led to the crucifixion of Jesus? 
  4. How do we question God and his ways in our lives, relationship, and the world? 
  5. What were the three questions asked of Jesus in this scene?
    1. Prophet – “You said you would destroy the temple… (v.29).
    2. Priest – “He saved others, he cannot save himself” (v.31).
    3. King – “Let the Christ, the king of Israel, come down now from the cross” (v.32). 
  6. Luke’s gospel explains that one of the thieves on the cross repented. Sharing what you know about the gospel, explain what you believe led him to turn from his sin and trust in Jesus. 
  7. Was it the lack of miracles that led the people to turn from Jesus? What was it? 
  8. How can questioning God’s word and ways lead us to turn from him? How is this happening in our culture today? How can we avoid this downgrade away from God’s word?

Mark 15:15-21 Sermon Questions

The Mocking of Jesus

  1. Why doesn’t Mark give great detail to the physical suffering of Jesus?
  2. What seems to be the guard’s primary focus? 
  3. What is the significance of the symbolism in Mark 15:17-19?
    1. Give biblical examples as to why you make those connections.
  4. How does Jesus respond to Pilate’s declaration of authority in John 19:10-11?
  5. How can we find comfort today in what Jesus says in v.11?
  6. How should Jesus’ example direct us as we interact with those in authority over us?
  7. How did the chief priests declare the ultimate rejection of Jesus as the Son of God (Jn 19:15)?
  8. What is the importance of Simon’s role in the crucifixion of Jesus? 
  9. Why did Mark mention Simon’s sons (Rom 16:13)?
  10. What should we learn from Jesus’ response to persecution? How then can we respond to difficult leaders, family members, and situations knowing that God cares for our every need?

Mark 15:1-15 Sermon Questions

The Kingdom of God is at Hand

  1. What is the main point of these verses?
  2. How do you see the guilt of Barabbas weighed against the innocence of Jesus? 
  3. Why did the people demand that Barabbas be set free?
  4. Why did they insist that Jesus be crucified?
  5. What was Pilate’s position regarding the guilt of Jesus? 
  6. What consumed the crowd’s thoughts so much that they could not see who Jesus was?
  7. What kept Pilate from seeing who Jesus truly was? 
  8. According to Jn. 10:10 what did Jesus come to do for people like Barabbas, Pilate, the crowd, and for you?

Mark 14:53-72 Sermon Questions

The Comfort of Obedience

  1. Why was Peter going to the high priest’s courtyard a bad idea? 
  2. What are some ways we can avoid temptation? 
  3. What were some of the lies the crowd was spreading about Jesus? 
  4. Why are lies such a danger to the church? Should a Christian be surprised when people speak falsely about them (Luke 6:26; Matt. 5:11)?
  5. Where does Jesus’ boldness come from in the face of the lies and false charges (v.62)?
  6. What was it that led Peter to deny Christ? Think about how quickly Peter denies Christ despite all he had experienced with him. 
  7. To what extent does Peter deny Christ (v.71)?
  8. What is the consequence of Peter’s denial of Jesus (v.72)?
  9. What is the consequence of our turning from our Savior to embrace sin? 
  10. Where is the hope of restoration in this story (v.62)?
  11. What do you think Christ returning in power with the clouds has to do we Peter’s rejection? What does it have to do with the sins that you struggle with?

Mark 14:43-52 Sermon Questions

  1. What is the significance of the garden scene taking place under cover of darkness? 
  2. Look up some verses that talk about the tension between light and dark. (eg: Eph. 5:8,11; 1 John 1:6-7)
  3. How did Judas’ keeping sin in the dark escalate? 
  4. We do not wrestle against flesh and blood, but in what ways does Satan use earthly things to distract us? 
  5. How can we avoid being swept up in gossip, lies, and an overall mob mentality? Look to Philippians 4:8.
  6. How did the disciples’ fear lead them to respond in the strength of the “natural” man? Give examples from Mark 14:32-52. 
  7. In the gospel of John, what is the significance of Jesus’ response in John 18:5?
  8. How does Jesus’ response in John 18:5 show his unhindered devotion to the will of the Father? Also, look back to Mark 14:49 and discuss the impact of Jesus’ statement in light of all that has taken place in the garden.
  9. What was Jesus’ primary concern while in the garden? 
    1. Is your primary concern to carry out the will of God, to see the scriptures fulfilled, or are you more concerned with your comfort, success, and acceptance?  
  10. Why do you think Mark includes vv. 51-52. Explain your answer from scripture. 

Mark 14:32-42 Sermon Questions

Divine Conflict

  1. How do you respond when faced with conflict? 
  2. What do you see as the primary conflict in the Garden of Gethsemane?
  3. How did Jesus respond to the heaviness of the moment in the Garden?
  4. How did Jesus’ holiness influence his reaction to what he was about to face? 
  5. Why did Jesus continually instruct the disciples to watch and pray? 
  6. Why did Jesus continually invite his disciples to pray when he knew they would fail? 
    1. Jesus wasn’t as concerned with the disciples’ success in the Garden as he was in their learning dependence on him for what lay ahead. 
    2. Discuss how God often uses our failures to prepare us for what we will face in the future. 
      1. Where else in scripture do you see this?  
  7. What principles should we learn from the Garden when facing personal/spiritual conflict? 
    1. Place – Remember to spend time in God’s word, being reminded of who He is and who you were created to be. 
    2. Purpose – During personal/spiritual conflict, we should engage in “watching” and “praying.”
  8. When facing conflict, what does it mean to “watch” and “pray”? 
  9. How do “watching” and “praying” show our dependence on Jesus? 

Mark 14:27-31 Sermon Questions

The Confidence of Christ

  1. Upon what does Jesus base his declaration in v. 27? 
  2. Where in the Old Testament do you see the declaration Jesus made? 
  3. Why is it important that Jesus base his announcement on scripture? Why is it important that we filter our thoughts, feelings, and emotions through the word of God? 
  4. How can we do this better? 
  5. How did Jesus display his trust in the sovereignty of God to his disciples in v.28?
  6. In the face of difficulty, fear, or opposition, how do you remind yourself of the sovereignty of God? Does it bring you comfort? Discuss why or why not. 
  7. How does Jesus’ confidence in the salvation promised by God reflect in his interaction with Peter? 
  8. What were two things that led to Peter’s confusion regarding Jesus’ message? 
  9. How are you tempted to be too self-confident or to have too little self-awareness? How does this play out in your life? 
  10. What promise does Jesus say will follow his resurrection (v.28)? What does this promise mean to those who trust in him today (Zech 13:9)? 

Mark 14:12-26 Sermon Questions

A Meal Worth Remembering

  1. Why was it important for Jews to celebrate the Feast of Unleavened Bread and the Passover? 
  2. What is the significance of the repeated use of the word “prepare” in the first few verses? 
  3. What are the implications for us as we approach the Lord’s Supper today? 
  4. When Jesus pronounces that one of the disciples will betray him, why did they respond the way that they did? 
  5. Have you ever considered Judas’ proximity to Jesus, yet he was so far away from him? What are examples of this today? 
  6. Discuss the significance of Jesus’ pronouncement in v.21. 
  7. How would the disciples’ view of the Passover meal change after hearing Jesus’ words in v. 22-23?
  8. Discuss the importance of Jesus’ claim in v.25. Where do you see this fulfilled in scripture? 
  9. In light of Jesus’ promise, how should we live today? How should we view the Lord’s Supper? 

Mark 14:1-11 Sermon Questions

Love Knows No Limit

  1. What is the significance of Passover and the Feast of Unleavened Bread?
  2. Look back in Mark to find reasons why the religious elite wanted to kill Jesus. 
  3. How do those instances inform vv. 3-9? 
  4. What did Mary’s actions toward Jesus show about her understanding of who he was? 
  5. What did the reaction of the others offer about their knowledge of who Jesus was?
  6. Why was Judas’s response so surprising? 
  7. The religious elite looked to Jesus for a blessing, and Judas looked to benefit from him. What was Mary’s hope? 
  8. Does Jesus’ teaching mean that Christians today don’t have to care for the poor? Explain your answer. 

It is important for you to have John’s account in mind as you discuss these verses (John 12:1-8)